Tag Archives: Indie pop-rock

Austin-via-Australia Band, Go Fever, Releases an Impressive Debut

14 Jun

Acey Monaro, lead singer-songwriter of new wave indie rock band, Go Fever, has taken a roundabout way to become part of the dynamic Austin music scene.

Raised in rural Australia, Monaro dropped out of school at 14, left home shortly thereafter, and a few years later, married a much older man. By age 26, that relationship had ended, and Monaro refocused on music as her muse — writing songs and performing as a solo artist in Sydney.

On a vacation to the States, she visited Austin, and fell in love not only with its music, but also with one of its musicians, a bass player named Ben Burdick, who would become part of her new band. That decided it. She made the move to Texas permanent, recruited several more players to join her and Burdick, and began working on songs that would comprise Go Fever’s self-titled debut album.

Go Fever is a ten-song set of catchy new wave pop, with a solid alt-rock foundation and a bit of a throwback feeling to some of the tracks. Monaro’s vocals are infused with her distinctive Aussie accent, which brings to mind fellow Aussie, Courtney Barnett, as well as American vocalist, Angel Olsen, and bands such as Tennis and La Sera. Her lyrics are bold and can be irreverent at times, with the occasional word that can’t be played on the radio (unfortunately, including in the catchy, Elvis Costello-like “United States of my Mind”). The musicianship is exceptional throughout the album.

Track highlights: The first track on Go Fever is the melodic alt-rock standout, “Come Undone.” A road trip rhythm gives it a high-energy pace while Monaro effortlessly sings the vocals over piano, guitar and the occasional synth swoosh.

“Folk Zero” starts slowly over strummed electric guitars. Organ and guitar stingers build toward a big stadium rock sound by the end.

Even though Go Fever is landlocked in the heart of Texas, it doesn’t mean that the band can’t handle a little surf rock on “Savannah,” a song with a definite old-timey feel complete with a Clarence Clemons-ish saxophone solo near the trail-out.

Finally, on the second-to-last track, “Surprise! I Never Loved You,” the band travels back even further in time to belt out a sassy 60s girl-rock number, with fun lyrics and rich harmonies.

Go Fever is earning positive notices from critics and fans — helped by recent appearances at SXSW and other high-profile events. The band seems to have a lot of upside potential.

Hot Young Band, Night Talks, Making Waves in SoCal Indie Music Scene

31 May

Dating back to the 1960s, when legendary bands such as the Doors, the Byrds and Buffalo Springfield emerged from the Southern California rock scene, L.A. has always had a sound. This has continued to now with indie artists such as Warpaint, Best Coast, Silversun Pickups, Local Natives, and Jenny Lewis calling the L.A. area home.

In 2017, you can add a new young band to that list — Night Talks — which just released its debut album, In Dreams.

The four-piece alt-rock group fronted by lead vocalist Soraya Sebghati brings a fresh new sound to the L.A. music scene. Sebghati’s versatile vocals range from angelic to edgy a la Evanescence. She’s backed by an outstanding trio of players that includes Jacob Butler on guitar, Josh Arteaga on bass and his brother, Cris, on drums.

In addition to solid guitar-driven foundations, In Dreams’ numbers often include layers of synthesizer — giving the tunes a full, rich ambiance. And always, Sebghati’s confident, expressive vocals distinguish the album from the ordinary.

Track highlights: The album is loaded with songs that could be considered standouts. My four favorite tunes on the album didn’t even include two that the band has released as video singles, showing how consistent the band’s quality is from top to bottom.

“Mr. Bloom,” the band’s second single is an excellent place to start. It’s an explosive, driving alt-rock track that features a sterling vocal performance by Sebghati, backed by sharp roaring guitars and uplifting harmonies in the chorus.

“Black and Blue” features a playful synth-pop melody with a captivating stop ‘n’ go beat. “Glass” slides over to the dreamy side, with its glistening guitar chords and spellbinding vocals. Butler’s guitar work on this track is outstanding as well.

“Jungle” is the band’s latest music video. It’s an ominous-sounding tune with synths that are almost theatrical at times. The album concludes with the title track — a gentle, swaying slow dance that showcases Sebghati’s softer side.

In Dreams is an outstanding debut from a band that promises to be around for a long time.

 

Robyn Hitchcock’s Latest Blends Groovy Throwback Rock with Topical Lyrics

12 May

Robyn Hitchcock is a highly respected indie rock artist. Now 64, he’s been practicing his craft as a solo artist and frontman with a number of bands across five decades: with well-known UK band, the Soft Boys (1976 – 1980); the Egyptians (1985 – 1993), the Venus 3 (2006 – 2010), and him alone.

All told, he’s been involved with more than 20 studio albums — the latest being his first self-titled release of his career. I guess it’s better late than never to discover who you are.

Seriously, Hitchcock is an extremely accomplished lyricist and musician, and it shows on this album. On the ten songs, he tried to come to grips with all the global political upheaval lately, including Trump’s election in the US and Britain’s so-called Brexit from the EU.

On Robyn Hitchcock, we hear him effortlessly blend five decades of rock from the psych-rock of the Beatles to today’s alt-rock bands. Clear influences include rock legends such as the Beatles, Byrds and Big Star. Hitchcock, who recently relocated to Nashville from his native UK, used a lot of experienced session players to create a full band sound — without actually assembling a band.

Track highlights: Opener “I Want to Tell You What I Want” is driving alt-rock. Pulsing bass and muted percussive guitar sets up the rhythm. Growling guitars are mixed with a combination of spoken and sung vocals.

The next track, Virginia Woolf,” features Hitchcock’s edgy, raspy guitar. The melodic sound he achieves is reminiscent of the Beatles’ rock hits of the Revolver to White Album era.

“Mad Shelley’s Letterbox” could be performed by the Byrds, with rich Beatles-like harmonies near the end of the song.

“Detective Mindhorn” is bouncy and fun. Finally, the second-to-last track, “Autumn Sunglasses,” takes you back to the trippy psychedelic era of the late 1960s.

All along, Hitchcock keeps the music and lyrics current and relevant, so Robyn Hitchcock represents much more than an aging hippie looking longingly toward his golden past.

 

The New Pornographers Release Confident New “Whiteout Conditions”

3 May

The New Pornographers debuted in 2000 as something of a Canadian super-group, bringing together three accomplished lead singers — A.C. “Carl” Newman, Dan Bejar and Neko Case — every few years for a new album and a tour. It should be noted that while Case is often identified as Canadian due to her lengthy association with the New Pornographers, she’s American. She was born in Virginia and considers Tacoma, Washington to be her hometown.

On the New Pornographers’ most recent album, Brill Bruisers,” the band incorporated generous helpings of synthesizer into its set-list with the help of something called an arpeggiator — a hardware- or software-based gizmo that takes the notes of a synth chord and effortlessly transforms them into an arpeggio.

Whiteout Conditions, the band’s seventh studio album, again makes liberal use of the arpeggiator. And while this album doesn’t have quite as many hits packed into it as Brill Bruisers (which was, after all, about the hit songwriting factories of New York City in the 1960s), it’s still a dynamic, high-energy indie musical feast.

The album features propulsive, synth-driven pop-rock, with fabulous vocals and mesmerizing harmonies from singer-songwriter Newman, Case, and Canadian keyboardist, Kathryn Calder. Newman’s tightly packed, crisp lyrics are meaningful and thought-provoking.

By the way, absent from this New Pornographers album is co-founder, Bejar, who was busy with his other band, Destroyer, at the time this was recorded.

Track highlights: The album explodes out of the starting gate with “Play Money,” with its rapid-fire rhythm, multiple layers of sweet and fuzzy synths and Case’s lead vocals effortlessly rising and falling.

On the title track, Newman takes the lead, backed by strong harmonies from Case and Calder. It’s anthemic, with the arpeggiator creating a jittery, skittering landscape.

On to track 3, the biggest hit of this collection. “High Ticket Attractions” features Newman and Calder on call-and-response vocals, with rich harmonies and big synth chords in the chorus.

Track 10, “Clockwise,” starts with angelic backing vocals and builds into a driving road song with wonderful imagery painted by Newman’s lyric, “In the valley of the lead singers.”

The album closes with a throwback 70s feeling on “Avalanche Alley.”

While the album is weighed down a bit by some sameness from one track to the next, you’ll find Whiteout Conditions to be a great addition to your pop-rock portfolio.

 

Quivers’ Debut Reveals Another Promising Aussie Band

26 Apr

In recent years, Aussie bands have had a significant influence on indie music. Boy & Bear, Cub Sport, Empire of the Sun, Husky, Little May, Paper Kites, and The Trouble with Templeton are just a few of the many indie bands from Australia that have lots of fans worldwide. But how many bands do you know from Tasmania? For me, there’s one: Quivers.

Quivers is a five-piece band that was founded in Tasmania’s capital city of Hobart. Tasmania is an island state, located 150 miles south of the Australia. The band plays catchy jangle rock, with some elements of shoegaze and lo-fi vocals that are deep in the mix at times. After Quivers released its debut album, We’ll Go Riding on the Hearses, the band relocated to the city of Melbourne.

The album’s unusual name comes from a tragedy experienced by lead singer-songwriter, Sam J. Nicholson, who lost his brother, Tom, to a free-diving accident. The album served as the emotional outlet for some of Nicholson’s grief.

We’ll Go Riding on the Hearses was originally issued in 2016 as a handmade cassette, with different covers on the limited edition copies. In early 2017, the band decided to release a CD of the ten tracks.

Track highlights: My favorite song on the album is the fourth track, “Chinatown.” The cut starts with strummed guitar and pensive vocals. After several minutes, it transitions to a more up-tempo arrangement featuring crisp drumming, nice guitar work and the addition of backing vocals.

The title track is sprawling and jangly. It’s melodic, with harmonized backing vocals and softly thundering drums. There’s organ in the lead break and even some light brass near the end.

“Pigeons” is the first single that Quivers has released from We’ll Go Riding on the Hearses. The arrangement features bigger, reverbed guitars with the vocals quite low in the mix. “Driving Rain” is another highlight — bright and jangly with a straight-ahead beat.

My final favorite is “Phosphorescence.” It’s a happier tune, at least musically, with a skipping rhythm that incorporates both drums and muted percussive guitar notes. It’s also laced with big surf-y guitars with some edgier guitar work near the end.

Give this band a try. You can find them on Bandcamp and impress your friends with your amazingly global knowledge of indie music!

 

Clap Your Hands Say Yeah’s “The Tourist” One of the Best of 2017 So Far

13 Apr

Clap Your Hands Say Yeah is a pioneering art-rock band from Philadelphia. When it debuted in 2005, the band was one of the first to more or less bypass the traditional system of distribution through an established record label — selling albums by word of mouth generated through music blogs and smaller shows.

Today, four of the five founding members have gone their own way, leaving only singer-songwriter and lead vocalist, Alec Ounsworth. Question: does this mean that the band’s name should now be Yeah! (with Clap, Your, Hands and Say all gone?) Just wondering…

Anyway, the good news is that, if anything, the disassembling of the original quintet into just Alec and miscellaneous friends has resulted in even more creativity and cohesiveness, leading to what may be the band’s best album to-date.

The arrangements in The Tourist are sharp and crisp — with keyboards, guitars and prominent rhythms working in perfect harmony. Tracks range from guitar-driven to synth-rock, with one folk-rocker (“Loose Ends”) — all featuring Ounsworth’s unique vocals.

Track highlights: The third track, “Down (Is Where I Want to Be),” starts with a funky, off-kilter beat with pinging synths, before transforming into a guitar-driven rocker.

Tune 5, “Better Off,” features snappy, up-tempo rock, layered synths and some jangly guitar. Rich Beatles-like harmonies emerge near the end of the track.

The best song on The Tourist is “Fireproof,” a fabulous, rhythm-driven track that incorporates a muted percussive guitar, thumping bass drum, cool bass line, and shakers — with psychedelic synths and vocals that vary between frenetic and soothing.

The second to the last track in the ten-song set is “Ambulance Chaser.” There are swirling, swelling synths over strummed guitar and rapidly sung, breathless vocals. Ounsworth cynically declares, “I’ll take my medicine and you’ll just hope for the worst.”

The Tourist was created at a time of “intense soul-searching” for Ounsworth, and this has certainly served as inspiration for a true masterpiece.

 

Long-time Fans’ Investment in Real Estate Continues to Pay Dividends on “In Mind”

5 Apr

If you’re an indie music fan, you probably know that one of the many sub-genres of indie rock is “jangle pop-rock.” Well, if you decided to look up the definition of jangle pop-rock in the encyclopedia, you shouldn’t be too surprised to find this: see Real Estate, because the New Jersey band truly epitomizes this particular sub-genre.

On Real Estate’s fourth album, In Mind, the band once again offers a variety of the most sunshiny, feel-good, jangle pop-rock anywhere. But the band has undergone some changes lately, and this ensured that In Mind isn’t just a rehash of its very successful Atlas album.

For starters, Real Estate now has a new lead guitarist. Julian Lynch has replaced founder, Matt Mondanile, who wanted to spend more time with his other project, Ducktails. In addition, the band chose well-respected producer, Cole M.G.N. (Beck, Julia Holter, Ariel Pink’s Haunted Graffiti) to oversee In Mind. These changes allow the band to delve more deeply into the psych-tinged rock of the late 60s and 70s — recalling the Byrds and even The Beatles at times, with one track that has a three-minute trail-out reminiscent of “I Want You (She’s So Heavy)” from the Beatles’ Abbey Road album.

Track highlights: The album opens with “Darling,” which is classic Real Estate — a lightly tripping tune with crisp drumming, a great bass line, and breezy synths and vocals. Not to mention a really cool music video featuring a horse. Check it out.

“Stained Glass” builds from a harpsichord intro into bigger jangly guitars that harken back to the Byrds in the late 1960s. Staying in that era, “Two Arrows” is the tune that begins with a languid jangle, but finishes with a psychedelic guitar and organ jam that increases in intensity over the song’s final three minutes before suddenly cutting off — a la the Beatles’ “I Want You.”

There are several more very worthy tracks on the album, including bassist Alex Bleeker’s “Diamond Eyes,” but I’ll finish my list with the closer, “Saturday.” This has a deliberate chamber-pop piano intro, but then ramps up in tempo and energy into a quintessential Real Estate jangle with a warm lead vocal and rich harmonies.

In Mind is an outstanding album with a lot to like from a very accomplished name in indie music.