Tag Archives: Aussie artists

Husky’s “Punchbuzz” an Uplifting, Intelligent Collection of Indie Pop-Rock

19 Apr

Melbourne, Australia’s indie pop-rock duo, Husky, is back with their third full-length release, Punchbuzz.

Husky Gawenda, who sings lead vocals and plays guitar, founded the group in 2008 along with Gideon Preiss, who plays keyboards and contributes to the rich vocals. Starting as primarily an indie folk act, Husky continues to build on their folky beginnings by incorporating synthesizers and a variety of electronic sounds and effects into this solid 10-song set.

Punchbuzz was released in mid-2017 and Husky focuses most of their support for their music on the Australian market — so the album is relatively unknown in the States. But this is a cohesive collection of songs that’s well worth your time to get to know — reminding me of bands such as Fleet Foxes, Crosby, Stills & Nash at their most harmonious, the ethereal feeling of The War on Drugs, and even a dash of homage to psyche bands of the 1960s at times.

Track highlights: “Ghost” is the warm and welcoming opener — shimmering synth-pop that features soothing, mellow lead vocals throughout, with catchy choruses.

“Shark Fin” follows that up with its frenetic, Flashdance-like electronic drumbeats under jangly guitar riffs. Lots of cool harmonies in the lead break.

Another highlight on Punchbuzz is “Late Night Store,” a tune that’s light and crisp — with great changes of pace and plenty of hooks. The synths are taut and chirpy over a stop-n-go rhythm.

When “Walking in your Sleep” starts, you’d swear that Husky borrowed the guitarist from Fleetwood Mac. The guitar riffs sound so familiar. Once again, Gawenda’s vocal style is light and breezy, with bell-like keys and a 1970s feeling overall.

The closer for the 10-song set is perhaps the most fascinating track on the album. It’s experimental and ethereal, with warped synths rising, falling and swirling over a vaguely Caribbean rhythm. The lyrics are moody about lovers on a beach — with plenty of references to ghosts — ultimately tying this closer to the album opener.

There are other lyrical references such as “splinters in the fire” that carry over from one song to another as well, connecting central themes — making Husky’s Punchbuzz a tight, intelligent set of indie pop-rock that I think you just may love.

 

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Austin-via-Australia Band, Go Fever, Releases an Impressive Debut

14 Jun

Acey Monaro, lead singer-songwriter of new wave indie rock band, Go Fever, has taken a roundabout way to become part of the dynamic Austin music scene.

Raised in rural Australia, Monaro dropped out of school at 14, left home shortly thereafter, and a few years later, married a much older man. By age 26, that relationship had ended, and Monaro refocused on music as her muse — writing songs and performing as a solo artist in Sydney.

On a vacation to the States, she visited Austin, and fell in love not only with its music, but also with one of its musicians, a bass player named Ben Burdick, who would become part of her new band. That decided it. She made the move to Texas permanent, recruited several more players to join her and Burdick, and began working on songs that would comprise Go Fever’s self-titled debut album.

Go Fever is a ten-song set of catchy new wave pop, with a solid alt-rock foundation and a bit of a throwback feeling to some of the tracks. Monaro’s vocals are infused with her distinctive Aussie accent, which brings to mind fellow Aussie, Courtney Barnett, as well as American vocalist, Angel Olsen, and bands such as Tennis and La Sera. Her lyrics are bold and can be irreverent at times, with the occasional word that can’t be played on the radio (unfortunately, including in the catchy, Elvis Costello-like “United States of my Mind”). The musicianship is exceptional throughout the album.

Track highlights: The first track on Go Fever is the melodic alt-rock standout, “Come Undone.” A road trip rhythm gives it a high-energy pace while Monaro effortlessly sings the vocals over piano, guitar and the occasional synth swoosh.

“Folk Zero” starts slowly over strummed electric guitars. Organ and guitar stingers build toward a big stadium rock sound by the end.

Even though Go Fever is landlocked in the heart of Texas, it doesn’t mean that the band can’t handle a little surf rock on “Savannah,” a song with a definite old-timey feel complete with a Clarence Clemons-ish saxophone solo near the trail-out.

Finally, on the second-to-last track, “Surprise! I Never Loved You,” the band travels back even further in time to belt out a sassy 60s girl-rock number, with fun lyrics and rich harmonies.

Go Fever is earning positive notices from critics and fans — helped by recent appearances at SXSW and other high-profile events. The band seems to have a lot of upside potential.